Fast and simple detail tweaks


Any RTR model can be improved with extra detail and little effort, as we show with a Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T.

What we used

Bachmann 31-431 BR black 1F 0-6-0T
MasterPiece FF95 1F driver and fireman figures 
Springside DA16 Fire iron set
ModelU WD066 LMS/BR (M) Locomotive headcode lamps 

TOOLS & MATERIALS
Deluxe Materials Glue’n’glaze
T-Cut car polish
PVA glue
Rust brown and smoke black weathering powders.

 

Modern 'Ready-To-Run' (RTR) locomotives rarely need fettling. The exquisite miniatures presented to us are so good at times it can seem there’s nothing left for the modeller to do. 
Personalising a model to make it different to any other bought from a shop isn’t hard, and requires few tools - fine paint brushes and a cotton bud. The main item to address is the lack of footplate crew. The weathering is just a little powder dusted over the model. More fun was bulling up the paintwork using mildly abrasive car polish - it’s a simple technique used in other modelling hobbies but not so much on railway models.

 

1

Bachmann’s Midland 1F 0-6-0T is a lovely model straight from the box but even this little cracker can be improved and personalised by adding a few extra fine details.
00 gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 1

2

The open cab looks better without the moulded spectacle plates running across the inside. Push from the front with a cocktail stick to break the glue joint and remove them.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 2

3

Place a blob of Deluxe Materials Glue ’n’ Glaze on the end of a screwdriver and waggle it around the hole to form a skin. Keep the windows horizontal while drying. 
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 3

4

To protect the crew, locomotives were fitted with a canvas weather sheet. Many had locally made ironwork on the bunker to support this, but not No. 41661.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 4

5

Moulded coal never looks realistic, though Bachmann has tried by gloss varnishing it. Crushed with big pliers to a coarse dust, real coal is glued with PVA or Ballast Magic.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 5

6

MasterPiece Models produce a crew for the 1F, making installation a breeze. Both figures are washed with Citadel 'Nuln oil' into all the folds in the clothes.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 6

7

This prototype shot shows a set of fire irons on the tank tops. Springside’s set of whitemetal tools is simple to use, just remove the flash before painting.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 7 Springside Models

8

Railmatch Weathered Black or a dark grey looks better than pure black. When the paint is tacky, roll each tool through Lifecolor black and brown weathering powers.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 8 Railmatch Lifecolor

9

Looking at this image, the tank sides are shiny. Rather than use varnish, try polishing the paintwork with T-Cut and a cotton bud, avoiding the crests and numbers.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 9 T-Cut

10

Apply weathering powders for rusty brakeshoes. The footplate and boiler top get a dusting of Humbrol Smoke colour powder. Both stick well enough without fixative.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 10

11

The finishing touch is a headcode lamp from the ModelU 3-D printed range. These have a hole in the bottom so they can be pushed onto lamp irons without glue.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 11 ModelU

12

A couple of hours work transforms a fine model into something unique and personal. Have a go and you’ll find a great deal of satisfaction for little effort and cost.
00 Gauge weathering Bachmann Midland 1F 0-6-0T 12 Masterpiece
 
 

In 12 simple steps you can transform a brand new model into something more unique and realistic. This guide applies to all locomotives, not just the one we've used above.

 

For even more weathering/painting articles, click here.