How to transform laser board into stone


While laser board might be ideal for laser cutting, it is very smooth and slightly shiny. Here Phil Parker demonstrates how to get the right effect in just four steps.

When building a stone warehouse kit, I'd handily been supplied with a reject wall to experiment on. I tried using a rolling pin to force coarse sandpaper into the surface, but it didn't leave a mark. A hammer was no better and even worse, left dents. I was going to have to do this with paint. After a few attempts, I managed to do the job with a mix of paint and D.I.Y. store powdered wall filler. It's subtle, easy to do, very effective and could be used in many different places on a layout. 

Step 1. Car primer is sprayed onto the model. Holding the can a few inches further away from the surface than the instructions recommend ensures the paint is slightly dry when it lands. This way it doesn't settle smoothly but gives a little texture. 

Step 2. Starting with Phoenix weathered concrete paint, followed by Humbrol pale stone and light grey, colour is splodged on using a small sponge. This adds more texture and the mix of shades looks more natural than painting individual stones. It's a lot quicker too!

Step 3: Once the paint is fully dry, a wash of Railmatch acrylic track colour paint is wiped over the surface with some kitchen towel. 


Step 4: Powdered DIY wall filler is rubbed in to all the mortar lines and then misted with water from a small spray. On some areas, it took a couple of applications to fill the lines properly. Wipe the stone faces clean with your hand, but don't worry too much, any tiny amounts will add more texture and blend the colours. 

Need more advice? Some of the below articles may help. Also, take a look at the BRM Techniques page for all our latest guides and advice articles.

How to create rust with hairspray

Using pencils on brickwork

Weathering a wagon by dry brushing

Using Weathering Powders – Top Tips

Brush painting top tips

How to paint your models

How to make your model trains grubby

Take a read of our step-by-step guide to weathering a locomotive using paint washes and powders here. Or if you’d like more general tips on weathering a locomotive, see our article here.